Lemongrass Chicken Thighs

I’ve wrestled a lot with whether or not I should continue the blog.  It’s been almost a year since I’ve published new content.  Life gets in the way, and sometimes I don’t even have time to try a new recipe, let alone photograph and write about it.  Ultimately, I decided to only post when I get inspired and motivated.  Blogging is not my main source of income, and I want to enjoy it instead of feeling like it’s a burden to keep up.

 

With that being said, this is a recipe that I managed to develop and tweak.  It’s a very easy recipe – just throw the ingredients together in the morning, and let it marinade all day.  They cook up quickly on the grill, and pair easily with any number of sides.  I’ve used both fresh lemongrass and lemongrass paste.  I used the version with the paste in this recipe, as it is more easily accessible for people, especially if you do not live close to an Asian grocery.  This dish has become a staple in our house, and even my picky son eats them up.

lemongrass chicken thighs

original recipe

Lemongrass Chicken Thighs

Lemongrass Chicken Thighs

Ingredients

Marinade:
1 Tbs fish sauce
1 Tbs soy sauce
1 tsp sugar
2 1/2 Tbs lemongrass paste
3 garlic cloves, chopped
Chicken
4 skinless, bone-in chicken thighs
cilantro leaves, optional

Instructions

  1. Combine marinade ingredients in a bowl. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Place chicken thighs in a zipper-seal bag and pour the marinade over them. Remove as much air out of the bag and seal. Move the chicken around inside the bag to evenly distribute the marinade. Chill for 4-8 hours.
  2. Heat grill to medium-high. Remove chicken from the bag, discard the extra marinade. Grill until the internal temperature of the chicken reaches 165°F, about 6-7 minutes on each side. Remove from the grill and garnish with cilantro.
http://kokocooks.com/2016/11/lemongrass-chicken-thighs/

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Mushroom Dumplings (Pot Stickers)

One of the few perks of being a teacher is that we have a chunk of time off in the summer. (There’s that whole “shaping young minds” part that’s cool as well.)  I utilized my free time this summer hanging out with Joey and Tyler, getting back into shape, and cooking lots and lots of food.

One thing I wanted to learn was how to make dumplings with the beautiful pleats.  So, I headed over to the coast and spent the day with Julie.  I got a one-on-one dumpling tutorial, and in return, I showed her how to make yeast donuts.

After learning how to make them, I’ve been on a dumpling binge.  I’ve made them with chicken. I’ve made them with pork.  I’ve made multiple batches with mushroom in my efforts to develop this recipe.  I tried the small, square wrappers that are available at most supermarkets. I tried the larger, thicker ones found at Asian markets.  You can see the difference in size and thickness of the two different wrappers.

I like the larger ones because they’re quicker to fill.  However, their quality can be inconsistent, which can be frustrating.  The smaller ones are the perfect one-bite size, and taste great steamed as well as pan fried.

One vital tip for making these dumplings: Don’t try to put too much filling in.  It will look like a very small amount compared to the size of the wrapper, but this is correct.  If you try to put too much in, the filling will ooze out as you are pleating the edges.  Just a word of warning.

adapted from Julie’s recipe.

Vegetarian Mushroom Dumplings

Yield: 30-40 large dumplings; 60-70 small dumplings

Vegetarian Mushroom Dumplings

Ingredients

3 Tbs olive oil
1 lb. mushrooms, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
½ c shredded carrot
1¼ c shredded cabbage
1 Tbs soy sauce
2 tsp sesame oil
1 tsp sriracha
⅛ tsp black pepper
1 green onion, light and dark green part thinly sliced

Instructions

  1. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and garlic, and cook until all liquid has left the mushrooms, about 8-10 minutes. If there is still liquid left in the pan, carefully drain it out. Add the carrot and cabbage and cook another 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat. Stir in the soy sauce, sesame oil, sriracha, black pepper, and green onion.
  2. Set up a wrapping station. Have filling, wrappers (if you’re using square wrappers, cut them into circles), a small bowl of water, and a clean paper towel nearby. Keep extra wrappers covered with a damp paper towel.
  3. Place a small amount of filling (about 1 tsp for small, 2 tsp for large) in the center of the wrapper. Dip your index finger in the water and wet the top edge of the wrapper. Dry fingers on the paper towel. Pleat the edges to crimp closed (see video ). Place finished dumpling on a baking tray. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.
  4. For potstickers: Heat 1 Tbs of vegetable oil in a skillet over high heat. Add 8-10 dumplings (don’t overcrowd the pan) and brown on bottom side, about 4 minutes. Add ¼ c water and reduce heat to medium. Cover pan and let potstickers cook another 3 minutes. Remove lid from pan and if any water then continue cooking until water has evaporated. Serve with soy sauce for dipping.

Notes

Wrappers come in packages of 50.

http://kokocooks.com/2013/08/vegetarian-mushroom-dumplings/

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Vegetarian Fried Spring Rolls

I previously mentioned my confusion between spring rolls and summer rolls. So, here’s another source of confusion – spring rolls (fried) or egg rolls?  I’ve seen these also described as both.  Here’s my understanding of the two:

Spring rolls and egg rolls are both wrapped and fried.  The difference is in the wrapper.  Egg roll wrappers are somewhat thick and have egg in them.  Spring roll wrappers do not have egg and are much thinner.  And a little bigger.  I give spring roll wrappers the slight edge because their thinness means more flaky layers encasing the filling.

I found that these rolls fry better at a higher temperature.  You don’t need to wait for the filling to cook, so they just need to fry enough to brown the outsides.  It takes just a few minutes for all sides to crisp.

I can’t stress enough the importance of wrapping the rolls tightly.  If not, the filling gets soggy, and the whole thing could possibly open up and fall apart (see above picture.)

original recipe

Vegetarian Fried Spring Rolls

Vegetarian Fried Spring Rolls

Ingredients

7 oz. tofu (half a block)
2 Tbs olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 c chopped mushrooms (about 4 large)
½ c chopped, cooked glass noodles (can substitute with vermicelli)
¼ c shredded carrot
1 ¼ c shredded cabbage
2 Tbs hoisin sauce
1 Tbs chili sauce (like sambal oelek)
2 Tbs cornstarch
2 Tbs water
15-20 spring roll wrappers
Oil for frying
For Dipping
Sweet chili sauce

Instructions

  1. Fold a clean towel in fourths and place on a plate. Put tofu on top of towel. Place a paper towel on top of the tofu. Weigh tofu down using a casserole dish (or another plate) with three or four unopened cans (soda cans, soup cans, etc...) set inside. Let sit for 30 minutes, while you prep the other ingredients. Once tofu has been pressed, dice into small cubes.
  2. Heat olive oil in a saute pan over medium-high heat. Add garlic, mushrooms, and tofu, and cook until mushrooms have softened and released most of their liquid. Add noodles and carrot and saute another minute. Remove pan from heat and stir in cabbage, hoisin sauce, and chili sauce. Mix until well combined.
  3. Make a paste by stirring together the cornstarch and water in a small bowl. Peel one spring roll wrapper off the stack. Cover remaining with a damp paper towel. Lay wrapper so it looks like a diamond on a flat surface. Place a rounded 2 Tbs of filling in corner closest to you. Fold the close corner over the filling. Begin to tightly roll, folding the sides in as you go, burrito style. Make sure to tightly roll during all stages.Before rolling the final flap, paint the cornstarch glue along the edges of the far corner, then finish rolling the spring roll (see above picture). Place spring roll seam side down on a parchment lined baking sheet. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.
  4. Pour oil to fill fryer (or Dutch oven) to a 3-inch depth. Heat oil to 370-375°F. Fry spring rolls, 3 or 4 at a time, rolling them to brown on all sides. Remove spring rolls with a slotted spoon to a paper towel lined wire rack. Serve with sweet chili sauce for dipping.
http://kokocooks.com/2013/07/vegetarian-fried-spring-rolls/

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Homemade Tonkotsu Ramen

My husband got it in his head to make tonkotsu broth for ramen.  Ramen is one of our new obsessions.  For all the wonderful Asian restaurants in this area, there are only a few that make ramen.  Not the curly stuff in packaged squares.  Not the stuff in styrofoam cups.  The real deal.

 

Tonkotsu broth for ramen is arguably the most difficult, because of all the work involved in making it.  Joey started one evening, and let the broth simmer all night.  While he waited for it to cook down, he decided to make the chasu –  cooked pork belly that goes on top of the soup. The house smelled like pork for days.  The broth didn’t turn as milky as what I’m used to seeing, but it tasted amazing. After eating the magical homemade broth, the commercial noodles did not match.  So now I’m working on making ramen noodles.  This is very typical of how things go around here – one cooking endeavor leads down a rabbit hole to deeper and more intricate recipes.  The broth is way too extensive for me to post as a recipe, especially since I’m trying to post more user-friendly fare.  So why the reason for this post?

 

Really, I just wanted to brag.

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Avocado Mango Spring Rolls

I never know what to call this dish.  I’ve ordered it just about every time we eat at a Vietnamese restaurant.  I usually call them summer rolls, but I’ve seen them also referred to as spring rolls.  I’m going to call them “fresh spring rolls,” so as not to confuse them from “fried spring rolls.”  On a recent cleaning rampage, I found two opened packages of rice paper wrappers in the back of the pantry.  They were in (separate) resealable bags, and luckily, still tasted fresh.

If you’ve never worked with rice paper wrappers before, they’re quite fun.  They’re sold in Asian markets (and sometimes in supermarkets).  When dry, they’re stiff.  You wonder how they could possible fold.  Even after you dip them, they’re stiff.  And still you wonder, “how are these going to wrap without cracking?

Then it happens. After you arrange the filling on the wrapper and get ready to fold, they’re miraculously soft, pliable, and more than a little sticky.

Rolling them can be tricky: If they’re too loose, the filling tumbles out when you bite into it.  If they’re too tight, the wrapper may split.  During the multiple times I made these, I both fully encased the filling and left one end open. If you decide to do the latter, move the filling to one side of the wrapper.

Usually in restaurants, these rolls are served with a creamy, peanut sauce.  I didn’t think that would go very well with the avocado and mango, so I came up with a lighter, ponzu dipping sauce.  If you can’t find ponzu you can substitute with an equal amount of soy sauce mixed with a little bit of fresh lemon juice (and maybe a squirt of fresh orange juice if you have some on hand.)

original recipe

Avocado Mango Spring Rolls

Yield: 4 rolls

Avocado Mango Spring Rolls

Ponzu sauce is a citrus flavored soy sauce. If you can't find it, you can substitute it with soy sauce mixed with a little bit of fresh lemon juice and a dash of fresh orange juice.

Ingredients

4 Butter lettuce leaves
1 carrot, peeled and shredded
5-inch piece of English cucumber, peeled and cut into strips
½ mango, cut into slices
1 avocado, cut into slices
⅔ c cooked rice vermicelli
Fresh mint leaves
Fresh cilantro sprigs
4 rice paper wrappers
Dipping Sauce
2 Tbs ponzu sauce
1 Tbs rice vinegar
1 tsp sesame oil
½ tsp chili sauce (optional)

Instructions

  1. Place lettuce leaves, carrot, cucumber, mango, avocado, mint, and cilantro on a plate. Fill a large saute pan with some water. Place a clean, non-terrycloth dish towel on a flat surface. Submerge a rice paper wrapper in the water in the saute pan for a few seconds. Lay wrapper on the towel. Place one lettuce leaf in the middle of the wrapper. Place other ingredients on top of the lettuce. Do not over stuff. Fold side edges over the filling. Roll the wrapper burrito-style. Make sure to press the filling together gently but tightly as your roll, or the filling will be too loose. Place spring roll on a plate. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.
  2. For the dipping sauce: combine ingredients in a small bowl. Serve with spring rolls.
http://kokocooks.com/2013/07/avocado-mango-spring-rolls/

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Lemongrass Beef Noodle Salad

 

Disclosure: I did not receive compensation for this post. All opinions are my own.

I recently posted about the lemongrass (sometimes spelled lemon grass) bushes in the front yard.  It’s just about time to trim the tops again.  I’d always used these stalks for cooking, so I’d never had to buy them.  Katie made a comment about buying stuff in a tube – I had no idea that’s how it was sold!  I’m not even sure how easy was to find in a store.  So when I discovered that Gourmet Garden made a lemon grass paste, I was thrilled.  I wanted to see how it compared.  It had that same lemony fragrance, and tasted exactly like the fresh stuff when used in recipes.  The tube says to use the paste in equal amounts to fresh lemongrass. If you’re trying to convert to stalks of lemongrass, I guesstimate ~2 tsp. paste = 1 stalk minced lemongrass.

This dish is on frequent rotation at our house.  It’s one of our go-to recipes for a quick, healthy meal.  Even Tyler likes to eat the beef, although I still can’t get him to try any of the vegetables.  The nuoc cham dressing is strong, so a little goes a long way.

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Today is the last day to enter the Flavors of Summer giveaway.  The prize pack includes a $50 Visa gift card and a copy of Summer Thyme by Jennifer Dempsey. Check out the recipes she made for S’mores Blondies – yum! Go here to enter the giveaway.  Winners will be announced during a PinChat Live tomorrow, July 3rd.

adapted from Savoring Southeast Asia, by Fuschia Dunlop

Lemongrass Beef Noodle Salad

Lemongrass Beef Noodle Salad

Ingredients

Beef
1¼ lbs. flank steak or shoulder steak
2½ Tbs Gourmet Garden Lemon Grass paste
5 cloves chopped garlic, divided
1½ Tbs fish sauce
1 tsp sugar
¼ tsp black pepper
3 Tbs vegetable oil
1 medium white onion, thinly sliced
Salad
8 oz. dried rice vermicelli
4 c shredded lettuce
½ cucumber, peeled and sliced into strips
¾ c matchstick carrots
Fresh cilantro sprigs and mint leaves
Fried shallots (optional)
Nuoc Cham dressing
4 Tbs fish sauce
3 Tbs sugar
6 Tbs water
3 Tbs lime juice
1 small clove garlic, minced
1 red chile, sliced (optional)

Instructions

  1. For the beef: divide steak along the grain into hunks about 2 inches wide. Slice each hunk thinly across the grain. In a large bowl, whisk together the lemon grass paste, half the garlic, fish sauce, sugar, and black pepper. Add the beef and mix to coat all the pieces. Cover and chill for 1 hour.
  2. For the salad: while the beef is marinating, prepare the rice vermicelli. Place dried noodles in boiling water and cook for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Turn off heat, cover pot, and let noodles sit for another 5-7 minutes, until noodles are soft. Drain noodles to a colander and rinse with cold water. Let drain until ready to serve.
  3. Prepare other salad ingredients and the nuoc cham while meat continues to marinate.
  4. Remove beef from the refrigerator; pat dry with paper towels. In a wok over medium-high heat, add 1 Tbs of the oil and heat until shimmering. Add the garlic and stir fry for 30 seconds. Add the onion and stir fry until onions brown around the edges, about 3-4 minutes. Transfer garlic and onion from the wok to a plate. Add 1 more tablespoon of oil, and turn heat up to high. Spread half the beef in an even layer on the bottom of the wok. Cook until browned on one side, about 2 minutes. Flip beef pieces over and complete cooking, another 1-2 minutes. Transfer beef to the plate with the onions. Repeat with remaining oil and beef.
  5. To assemble the salad: divide noodles into a bowl. Top with lettuce, carrots, cucumber, and beef. Garnish with cilantro and mint. Serve with nuoc cham.
http://kokocooks.com/2013/07/lemongrass-beef-noodle-salad/

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Crunchy Asparagus Rolls

I’m kind of a quiet person.  I don’t think anyone would ever accuse me of “oversharing.”  It’s not the most conducive personality toward self-promotion in the blogging world, but it’s how I am.  I constantly ask myself the question, “How much should I share with my readers?” I have a personal blog where I post lots of stories and pictures about family life.  I feel like this blog should focus more on the food and recipes.

So, in a break from my reserved self, I want to share this story with you.

Very recently, I was pregnant.  Then, heartbreakingly, I wasn’t.  It wasn’t the first time.  Or even the second.  I didn’t realize it would be so difficult to have another child. At first, I couldn’t even talk to my family about it.  Eventually, I told a few friends, and trusted that they would discreetly pass the information along to others.  In private, I cried a lot.  At work, I focused on connecting with my students, doing well on an important evaluation, and getting through the day.  I neglected this blog and social media for a bit.  I gave my son extra hugs and kisses.

For the three months that I was pregnant, I craved all the foods that I was supposed to avoid – hot dogs, caffeinated beverages, alcohol, and sushi.  Oh, sushi.  How I missed you.  One of my favorite sushi restaurants served the best crunchy asparagus roll.  I started making them at home to satisfy my sushi craving.  It wasn’t the same as my beloved spicy tuna kobachi, but the toasted seaweed-seasoned rice-crunchy exterior combination took enough of the edge off the craving.

original recipe

Crunchy Asparagus Rolls

Crunchy Asparagus Rolls

Ingredients

Rice
3 cups water
2 cups sushi rice
1/2 c rice vinegar
3 Tbs sugar
1 tsp salt
Asparagus
12 asparagus spears, trimmed
1/2 c flour
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 c panko crumbs
Oil for frying
Rolls
4 sheets toasted nori
Wasabi paste

Instructions

  1. For the rice: heat water and rice in a saucepan until boiling, stirring a few times. Turn heat to low, cover, and let cook until water has been absorbed, about 20 minutes.
  2. Transfer rice to a wide bowl. With a rubber spatula, fan rice out to cover the entire inside surface of the bowl. Let the rice sit for a minute to cool off, then gently bring rice back together in the center of the bowl. Repeat fanning process 4-5 more times until rice has cooled to room temperature. Sprinkle rice vinegar, sugar, and salt over the rice and gently stir to evenly distribute.
  3. While the rice is cooking and cooling, prepare the asparagus. Blanch asparagus spears in boiling water for 1 minute. Remove spears from boiling water and place them in a bowl of ice water to stop cooking process. Lay on a clean towel to dry.
  4. Set up a dredging station with three shallow dishes; place flour in first one, egg in the second, and panko crumbs in the third. Coat asparagus in the flour, then the egg, then roll in the panko. Place on a baking sheet. Pour enough oil in a cast iron skillet (or something wide enough to hold the asparagus) to make a 1-inch layer. Heat to 350 degrees and fry asparagus in batches until browned on all sides, about 1-2 minutes total. Place fried asparagus spears on a paper towel-lined baking sheet.
  5. Assemble the rolls: lay one sheet of toasted nori on a rolling mat (optional.) Carefully spread rice in a thin, even layer over the nori, leaving a 1/2 inch of the far edge of the nori bare. Gently pat the rice flat. Place three asparagus spears on the rice, and roll the nori, starting with the edge closest to you. Gently press the roll together as you roll. Cut the sushi roll into 6-8 even pieces. Serve with a dollop of wasabi.
http://kokocooks.com/2013/05/crunchy-asparagus-rolls/

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Thai Wonton Soup

Ah, I have finally emerged from my turkey coma.  I think I gained 5 pounds in the past week.  And now, all the holiday baking starts.  Heaven help me!  There are going to be so many enticing sweets hanging around the house.  Not only will I be busy with baking, but our busiest gigging season also starts up.  Now more than ever, I try to make quick and healthy dinners to get us through these busy times.

I’m a sucker for the Thai wonton soup at Pei Wei.  It’s a perfect example of a fusion dish – a traditional Chinese soup with a Thai inspired broth.  Any time I get takeout from the place, I always make sure to order this.  The wontons don’t take too long to make, and the wrappers are easy to work with.

original recipe

Thai Wonton Soup

Thai Wonton Soup

Note: I usually make a double batch of wontons and freeze half for a later use. To freeze, place freshly wrapped wontons on a lined baking sheet and place in the freezer. Once they are frozen solid, transfer them to a freezer-safe container and keep frozen until ready to use.

Ingredients

Wontons
½ lb ground pork or beef
1 clove garlic, minced
1 green onion, white and light green parts finely chopped
2 tsp minced fresh ginger
1 ½ Tbs soy sauce
2 tsp rice vinegar
¼ tsp black pepper
15-20 wonton wrappers (I used square)
Broth
2 Tbs olive oil
½ c lemongrass, sliced into rounds (3 small stalks or one large stalk)
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 Tbs ginger, roughly chopped
8 c chicken stock
1 c baby spinach, tightly packed
Garnish
Lime wedges
Thai basil

Instructions

  1. To make the wontons: In a mixing bowl, combine the ground pork, garlic, green onion, ginger, soy sauce, rice vinegar, and black pepper. Fill a small bowl with water. Place a wonton wrapper on a clean surface. Place about 2 tsp of meat mixture towards one corner of the wonton. Dip your fingertip in the bowl of water and lightly wet the edges of the square. Fold wrapper diagonally over the meat and press edges together to seal. Place wontons on a plate in a single layer.
  2. To make the soup: Heat olive oil over medium-high in a large pot. Add lemongrass, garlic, and ginger; sauté until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add chicken stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Using a mesh strainer, remove the solids from the stock. Gently drop the wontons into the stock and simmer another 10 minutes. Stir occasionally (and gently). Add the spinach and simmer another 5 minutes.
  3. Carefully spoon soup into bowls. Garnish with lime and Thai basil.
http://kokocooks.com/2012/11/thai-wonton-soup/

 

 

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Salmon Pho


Whenever I feel a little run down, I crave pho. There’s something about the combination of noodles and that magical broth that is so comforting. There was this one time when I had a performance on a Saturday night (typical.) I had been feeling run down all day, and went to grab dinner before the concert. After eating a bowl of beef pho, I felt instantly better. Well enough to get through a playing a two hour concert.

I was happy to find a recipe that duplicates pho broth and cooks in less than an hour. I had never thought to use salmon in Vietnamese noodle soup, but I really liked the combination. If you want an extra kick, add a few squirts of sriracha to the soup.


adapted from Cuisine At Home, June 2011

Salmon Pho

Salmon Pho

Ingredients

Broth
3 Tbs vegetable oil
1 large onion, sliced
2 Tbs minced fresh ginger
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
4 c water
4 c low sodium chicken broth
3 Tbs fish sauce
1 Tbs sugar
2 Tbs plus 1 tsp low sodium soy sauce
10 whole cloves
1 bunch fresh cilantro stems
2 tsp Chinese five spice powder
Soup
2 6-oz. salmon fillets
Salt and pepper
1 c sliced shitake mushroom caps
1 c matchstick carrots
¼ c thinly sliced white onion
12 oz. rice-stick noodles, cooked
Garnish
Bean sprouts
Chopped green onion, white and light green parts
Fresh mint leaves
Fresh basil leaves (Thai basil if available)
Fresh cilantro leaves
Sliced jalapeno
Lime wedges

Instructions

  1. Heat vegetable oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Saute onion, ginger, and garlic in the stockpot until softened, about 3 minutes. Add water, broth, fish sauce, sugar, soy sauce, cloves, cilantro stems, and five spice powder. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes. Using a large slotted spoon, pull solids out of the broth; discard. Turn heat back up to medium-high and bring broth back to a boil.
  2. Season salmon fillets with salt and pepper. Thinly slice crosswise (against the grain.) Set aside.
  3. Add shitake mushroom caps, carrots, and the ¼ c of sliced onions to the broth. Divide salmon and noodles evenly into four large soup bowls. Pour into the bowl, making sure to cover the salmon. The fish will cook in the hot broth. Garnish with bean sprouts, green onion, mint, basil, cilantro, jalapeno, and lime wedges.
http://kokocooks.com/2012/05/salmon-pho/

 

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Crispy Duck Fried Rice

We are fortunate to have a well-established Asian district in the heart of our city. The Mills-Colonial intersection and the surrounding blocks are packed with restaurants, groceries, and independent businesses that cater to the Asian community. We have a number of favorites in this area – three of our favorite Vietnamese restaurants, one of our favorite noodle shops, one of our favorite banh mi shops, and two of our favorite groceries.


My husband found a restaurant in this area that sells whole roasted duck. For a few extra dollars, they even chop the duck up for you. I have yet to visit this place, and am dying to take pictures of a whole (intact) duck. We have taken advantage of this convenience for a number of dishes at home, including this fried rice.


This recipe makes a LOT of rice, about 8 servings. I wanted to include ingredient amounts that used all the duck meat. If you don’t want to make that much at once (or if your wok isn’t big enough to handle that much food), then definitely halve the recipe.


original recipe

Crispy Duck Fried Rice

Crispy Duck Fried Rice

Make sure the duck skin gets really dark and crispy when stir frying. The meat won't burn as long as you keep stirring it.

Ingredients

Sauce
¾ c chicken stock
3 Tbs soy sauce
3 Tbs dark soy sauce (1 Tbs soy sauce plus 2 T brown sugar)
2 Tbs black vinegar (2 Tbs rice vinegar)
2 Tbs sweet chili sauce
Rice
4 Tbs peanut oil
6 cloves garlic, chopped
2 Tbs peeled and chopped fresh ginger
Meat and some skin from 1 roast duck (white and dark), shredded
2 ½ lbs baby bok choy, leafy green parts only, chopped
4 c diced mushrooms (we used beech mushrooms)
12 c cooked rice, cooled
3 bunches green onions, green parts only, sliced on the bias

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sauce ingredients. Set aside. Make sure all other ingredients are prepped before starting to cook.
  2. Heat a wok over high heat. Add oil and heat until nearly smoking. Add the garlic and ginger and stir fry for 30 seconds, until softened. Move to the top of the wok. Add the duck meat and stir fry until the skin and meat become crispy, stirring frequently (about 4-5 minutes.) Reduce heat to medium-high. Add the bok choy and mushrooms and cook until softened, about another 5 minutes. Add the rice and cook, stirring all the ingredients together. Pour the sauce over the rice, and continue to stir fry while constantly mixing, until the rice begins to get a little crispy, about 6-7 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in the green onions, and serve.
http://kokocooks.com/2012/03/crispy-duck-fried-rice/

 

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